BOSTON POLICE RESPOND TO MULTIPLE HAZMAT INCIDENTSToday, on Thursday, October 30, 2008, the Boston Police Department responded to multiple incidents involving a suspicious white substance arriving at several locations via the mail throughout the city. The Hazmat Team responded to the following locations: • At 12:52pm, The Boston Herald, 300 Harrison Avenue • At 3:15pm, The Christian Science Building, 210 Mass Ave. At this time, both of the above incidents remain under investigation. However, Boston Police Detectives and members of the Boston Police Hazmat Team have determined the following information. The Boston Police Department has learned of the reports from around the country concerning the receipt of letters containing a compact disc and a suspicious looking white powder. According to these reports, letters were sent to and received by media outlets, political offices and a few businesses (including McDonalds and Starbucks) nationwide. On Thursday, October 30, 2008, the Boston Herald located at 300 Harrison Avenue received one of these letters. Upon receipt of the letter, the building was evacuated. The suspicious looking white powder was analyzed and evaluated by the Boston Police Hazmat Team and determined the substance/powder to be harm free. Specifically, the powder was determined to be sugar. Meantime, in California, the FBI has already taken into custody an individual believed to be responsible for sending the letters. The motive is not known at this time. According to various media reports, the suspect in this case sent more than 120 envelopes containing a CD and packet of sugar labeled, ‘Anthrax Sample’. Additionally, a biohazard symbol appeared on the packet of sugar. None of the packets, to this point, have tested positive for hazardous material. 100 letters were sent to national newspapers, 20 to Congressional members, and 10 to businesses in Sacramento including McDonalds and Starbucks. One of the first letters was received by The Atlantic magazine on Monday. Attached are photos of the envelope sent to the Boston Herald: CD.JPG ENVELOPE.JPG